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Book Review: “Homeless Bird” (Get Lost in a Book) 📖 🇮🇳

If you’re anything like me, and need a break for a few hours from the pandemic, the news and hearing about the latest incident of human stupidity and evil, I recommend reading Homeless Bird, by Gloria Whelan. My brief, Goodreads review is down below.

This is another treasure of a book I found tucked away on a dusty, back corner clearance shelf at a bookstore. It’s a difficult book to read emotionally, as I noted in my review, as it touches on heavy themes at a young reader level. It’s really alarming to see women being treated as “things”, even in such a modern setting as the book takes place in. The writing made me reflect on religion and society makeup. I always try to be sensitive when I come across differences in theology or culture, but why can’t we get it right (regardless of our beliefs) that we’re all human with wishes, wants and feelings of our own? Is it such a hard thing to see humanity and worth in an “other”?

Enjoy the book; 10/10.

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Author: Stay at Home Book Tag🏡📚

This book tag was created by Princess of Paperback on YouTube. I found it on Books, Baking and Blogging. I’m not quite to the point of my YouTube channel being up and running yet, so I’m doing a blog. Consider yourself tagged if you’d like; my answers are below. 🌹

I provided links for all my books in case you’re interested in checking them out. Cheers. 😊

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Author: “Rebecca” Book Review (Gothic Romance)

Ever since I saw the movie Crimson Peak, I’ve been enraptured by Gothic Romance and the director’s (Guillermo del Toro) creative process. I dove into researching del Toro’s inspirations for Crimson and came across several books that inspired him while writing the movie’s script over seven years. 

One book that del Toro mentioned was Rebecca,  by Daphne du Marier. I finished reading the novel recently and came away feeling very pensive and wondering about human behavior, much as I did after watching Crimson Peak. Both works are disturbing to say the least, but I’ve come to like this in art–with the caveat that there’s a higher purpose and reason for including the disturbing elements. Good art makes us think, it makes us reflect and really struggle with what we believe and why. Good art advises us to not just blindly accept society’s agendas it passes out to us, like ready made  “soup of the day” menus.

Rather, good art is like a six course dinner of philosophy: you’re full of questions and wonder after you’re done, but you keep coming on back for more. Why? Because it’s your sustenance.

Keep on writing. ✏️

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Indie Author: Book Swap (List What You’re Reading)

Hi Arcians and internet wanderers. Tell me, what book are you reading right now? Leave a quick comment below and we can share our books together.

My current read is below. While you’re here, want to enter a creative writing contest? No winners or losers this week, just old fashioned fun with the imagination. And yes, that rhymed.

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A Brief Book Review: The Devil’s Arithmetic

The Devil’s Arithmetic, by Jane Yolen was a book recommended to me recently by a friend. The title both put me off and intrigued me. I’m not a huge fan of math nor of the Devil, to be quite frank. When I was struggling with geometry in high school, I would have assumed both were from Hell. But after learning Yolen’s novel was a fictional, time travel piece about the Holocaust, I decided to give it a go.

After all, I want to visit Auschwitz one day. The Devil’s Arithmetic was a way to do this from my living room couch.

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Take A Book, Leave a Book, Thoughts & Reviews

Book Review & Theory: The Turn of the Screw

A friend recommended reading Henry Jame’s novella, The Turn of the Screw. It’s a psychological horror, set in Victorian times in England in Essex, specifically. Throw in an old country estate named Bly–isolated and with a large pond–a couple of potential ghosts, a country church and I’m sold. Get me a cup of tea, some caramel popcorn and away we go. Nothing better than a cozy horror snuggled up in blankets.

Expecting something like Jane Eyre, I sat and read the novella (approximately 43,000 words) over a weekend, some in the car, some in restaurants and the rest at home. It’s a quick read–I particularly loved the short, but thick chapters, that gave just enough momentum to keep the reader going. The imagery, particularly the ghost sightings I adored. James has a way with describing just enough and letting your mind fill in the rest, particularly with domestic scenes so close to our experiences.

I got to the end, eager for answers, several theories at my side I developed. I met Mr. James there, holding his white handkerchief in a tease surrender, standing next to his character’s corpse. My theories fell to the wayside. I argued, I harangued, I politely condoled. But I would get no answers, it seemed. It was up to me and all the other readers since the 1800’s.

I screamed.

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Some of My Favorite Books & Why

With no particular rhyme or reason, here are five of my favorite books. There are, of course, many, many, many more.

Hurry, scurry, get thee to a library!

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