Bloggy

Introductory

Updates on the Journey

Hello and welcome to Peregrine Arc, a Horror Author’s Scratchwork. I published my first novel, Memory Bound, in October 2018. I’m currently working on my second horror novel, GOTD.* Both books feature female protagonists struggling to survive in worlds where uninvited guests come just a bit too close for comfort…

I’m also starting an Author YouTube Channel. Here you’ll find me talking about my writing, literature, and dabbling in some arts & crafts. This page is in development, but I’ll be sure to post updates here when I get the steamworks up and running. Won’t you join us?

*I only give my novels’ names in acronyms, until they’re published. Memory Bound, for example, was MB.

Ponderings

Surviving a Toxic Workplace: Five Thoughtful Tips (Get Out)

I’ve worked in a variety of settings over my career. Some of them have been toxic from day one; some slowly spoiled over time like a carton of milk, forgotten at the back of the fridge. No job is perfect , but when your work starts affecting your physical health, gives you severe anxiety, and makes you think of taking a sick day every morning when the alarm goes off–it may be time to move on.

Here are just a few of the strategies I’ve used that have helped me in previous jobs. Best of luck to you in your journey.

  1. Create your escape plan. I borrowed this from a YouTube video (or several) I watched years ago when I was stuck in an unhealthy work environment. Their advice was similar–make a plan to get out. Whether it’s through building up your savings, applying to jobs after work, taking night classes, putting in a request for a transfer…Sit down and put it together. A boat without wind or direction is just sitting in place. Accept that it may take time, but the earlier you start, the earlier you’ll get out.
  2. Create a good night routine. Anxiety can bubble up at night big time when you dread going into work the next day. You can replay stories in your mind, dwell on mistakes you made, or just build up work tasks into bigger monsters than they are.
    Consider bringing items into your bedroom that help you relax and bring you comfort, like soft blankets, soft lighting, or a good book to read. These will be ways to relax your mind and get a good night’s sleep. There are also many YouTube videos online for free with relaxing, sleep time or soothing music. Warm baths, exercise, and hot cups of tea are also other, low cost ways to relax. Journaling, prayer, and stretching are others.
  3. Eat the Frog. This is a funny saying, not to be taken literally. When you do get to work, try this approach. Eat the frog is a way of saying do the hardest thing first on your task list. Getting it out of the way can relieve some of the pressure you’ve built up and give you more brain space to focus on smaller tasks.
  4. Do What You Can; Don’t Stress Over What You Can’t Control. You’re leaving. You’re not going to be here forever. The building did not catch on fire and crumble to ash before you started working there; it won’t fall apart as you leave, most likely. And besides, the last time you checked, miracle worker was not on your resume. Do what you can to the best of your ability, be transparent about your work to whom you report to, and then clock out. You’re not here to burn bridges, you’re just looking to cross them and take care of yourself. If the rest of your coworkers can’t see the Emperor’s New Clothes for what they are and want to swim in toxicity, it’s their problem, not yours.
  5. Focus & Refocus: While at work, focus on your work. Get your tasks done; leave it at your desk and go home. Recharge, rejuvenate, re-be-you. Your job does not define your worth as a human being; it never has, and it never will. Refocus on what is important to you. Think of ways, or future jobs, that can better meet your values while still paying your bills and supporting your future goals. This will help you find your next job, or step, in life.

Cheers and take care.

Christianity: My Journey & Thoughts

Something to Consider: Sponsor a Child (Compassion)

Every year around this time, I post a little blog asking people to consider sponsoring a child through Compassion International. The saint and I have sponsored many children throughout the years and consider it part of our tithing. A few details are below. If you can’t support this ministry now, consider praying for these children and their families instead. Prayers are always free, needed and welcomed. Together in the Body of Christ, we can be the hands and feet of God. We can let these kids know that they matter and are loved.

For $38/month, you will be linked with a child (either you choose through Compassion’s website, or you can let them choose a child for you). You’ll exchange letters throughout their duration in the program, getting to know your child as they grow. There are options to send gifts as well, like birthday or Christmas gifts. Compassion approaches child welfare holistically–you’ll receive information on what local church program your child is a part of, and updates through their letters, or their local pastor’s letters.

The saint and I highly enjoy reading and writer letters to our kids. They come from all over the world, and all have their own dreams, personalities, abilities and stories to share. We feel very blessed and honored to share God’s love with these children and their families.

Thank you and God bless.

Short Stories & Poetry

A Very Short Story: Millennial Worker Bee

There once was a Millennial girl. She worked real hard, got good grades, and went out into the world. Every deadline, every good deed she sought–done.

That is, until the Waylayers came.

They came, armed and ready with their excuses, surrounding her at every turn: “I need more time!” and “I didn’t know I needed do that!” hung from their every orifice, the words bitter and broken, trailing over their lips.

Deadlines passed, expectations rose, foolishness ensued. And still, the little Millennial girl–branded by these Waylayers and naysayers as part of a lazy, decrepit generation–continued to see them disrupt, hem and haw, and delay progress. Fires broke out; chaos ensued. And still the little Millennial girl turned in her work on time, working dutifully at her desk, surrounded by the fires of Waylayers who burned it all to the ground. All efforts, ash, dust and must.

Until one day, the little Millennial girl stood up from her desk and leaned to crack her back. She took up her keyboard, broke it in two over her knee, and calmly picked up her purse and notebooks after tightening the bow around her ponytail. She said:

“That’s enough of this crap; I’m off to be a writer.”

And that was all she wrote.